Monthly Archives: December 2013

Nelson Mandela: Far More Than Words

Nelson Mandela: More Than Words

As we sadly say goodbye to one of the most influential people of our time, some will remember Nelson Mandela to be a hero while others a terrorist. Sometimes the truth can be hard to digest but the truth must be told and as the saying goes “the truth will set you free”. Well, here goes.

It is quite ironic how many people will come out speaking of racial violence towards whites; particularly that of the Church Street bombings and yet not many of them will come out and speak so passionately about the racist policies that led to such a reality of consequences. 

In all honesty, a man in his motherland, whether that be Iraq, Afghanistan or anywhere else, can never be a terrorist; should the Dutch boats come along and people move in, only to later bring about racial segregation; curtailing all rights and forcing the indigenous peoples out into the slums; abductions, police brutality and murder brought upon them first; thousands of arrests and political prisoners of peaceful protest; students gunned down by the police against those calling for racial harmony – and should one defend themselves against this, does that really make one a terrorist or a freedom fighter?

 It is never right to take another life. If anyone should be responsible then it should be the National Party governments and all of right wing politics to which gives birth to all suffering. In Mandela’s first interview (above) in 1961, he had basically said that violence was the last option, and that South Africa was not a country of one race but of many races. However, as we look at South Africa today, he achieved his goal to bring about one person, one vote but economically, it all appears to have benefited one race alone.

 According to Bloomberg, a more recent census published that: “About 80 percent of South Africa’s 51.8 million population is black, about 9 percent of the population is of mixed race, 8.9 percent white and 2.5 percent Asian.

While incomes for black households increased an average 169 percent over 10 years, their annual earnings are 60,613 rand ($6,987), or a sixth of that for whites. Incomes for white households increased 88 percent to 365,134 rand in the past decade.

Under white segregationist rule, black South Africans were disadvantaged by poor education that confined many to unskilled, low-paying jobs.”

 It is evidently clear that decades of racist policies from the National Parties has created racial divisions. However, the knife has cut far deeper than the social class layer. When we look at the most common denominator in this case, we must see that a minority of white people are hoarding all wealth whilst a majority of black people face the most hardest of struggles.

 This is not something that black people alone must challenge, but something white people around the world should also be challenging. We all have a part to play in ensuring that every child has a life that’s worth living regardless of where they come from or what skin colour they have. We can all make a change, and follow in Mandela’s footsteps we must.

 If we are truly to honour Nelson Mandela’s memory, then we must do more than simply reiterate the greatness of his quotes but also apply them to our every day lives. We must do more than praise his name. We must put into action the vision of what this great man sought out. We must attempt, at all costs, to bridge the gap between the richest and the poorest in every society. We must do all within our grasp to ensure that right wing governments are a thing of the past, and that ALL people have a fair shot at life as well as a fair opportunity to contribute at every level.

If we are truly to honour Nelson Mandela’s memory, then we must do more than simply reiterate the greatness of his quotes but also apply them to our every day lives. We must do more than praise his name. We must put into action the vision of what this great man sought out. We must attempt, at all costs, to bridge the gap between the richest and the poorest in every society. We must do all within our grasp to ensure that right wing governments are a thing of the past, and that ALL people have a fair shot at life as well as a fair opportunity to contribute at every level.

RIP Nelson Mandela. His legacy has not been left behind but is one that has only just begun. Mandela could have done a lot more for the people of South Africa, this is true, but in hindsight, his accomplishments to achieve democracy for all with his democratic vision of ‘one person, one vote’ will most definitely be one of his greatest victories for the South African peoples.

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The Glass Design: Why YOU Need The Unemployed

Style:

According to ONS there are 2.47 million economically ‘active’ unemployed people looking for work. There are 8.92 million economically “inactive” people not looking for work. There were 545,000 job vacancies for August to October 2013. Now tell me, how do you fit 2.47 million unemployed ACTIVE people looking for work into 545,000 jobs? You tell me how that is done, and I will tell the other 8.92 million to get off their “lazy” backsides and try.

In February this year, there were 2.51 million unemployed, and so I welcome the 0.4% decrease in unemployment. However, many public sector jobs have been scrapped, so what I don’t get is, if you can lower unemployment by offering more work in the private sector, hence raising more tax, then why can public sector jobs not stay or increase? Surely that would bring unemployment even further down? Where’s the money GOING?

Albeit, because of the design of the glass, it has been made only to fit so many people. This is because resources are scarce and materials limited.  Therefore, people are made to compete to grab their place in the champagne glass to which the rich more than happily drink out of. The next time you call someone lazy because they are unemployed, thank your lucky stars because it could easily be you.

Even if you break the definitions down, there are double standards everywhere!

‘Laziness’ is defined as being “unwilling to work or use energy.” Whereas ‘Energy’ is defined as “the strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity.” Who on Earth would choose to live an unsuccessful life over a successful one? Would someone who is consistently strong turn to addictive alcohol? drugs? gambling or anything else ascribed to the “scrounging unemployed”? Of course not, and if he did then surely it would mean that it was because he had a bad day; he was weak, he has fallen into an addiction and needs help; he is lacking the energy to cope and to keep on his toes. We tell him to rest.

Yet the unemployed we call “lazy” like they are strong and have all the energy in the world. We accuse them of being a shirker that unacceptably rest up and do nothing. On a whim, they choose a life of destitution; they choose addiction and failure like they don’t have a care in the world when maybe, just maybe, they simply lack the strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity.

I suppose that it’s far more easier just to call these people lazy, because that would be the lazy option in itself than trying to help and care for those who lack energy due to hardship and malnutrition.

The rich man who sits at home in his nice big house and who sometimes likes to play tennis in the garden; the man who simply picks up his phone and tells others what to do so they all work hard to get by whilst simultaneously making him rich.. He is not lazy but a successful man. But our friend on welfare, the horrible, grim, work avoiding lazy scum bag who offers very little to a society that equally offers very little to him.. He is the laziest of them all and it is him that has caused recessions, depressions and the reason we are all stressing!

“Why can’t his life suck as hard as mine” I yell!!! “Why can’t he sweat the blood and tears that I do!” only to keep these rich men in power.. “Why is it that I am a slave and he is not?” “Make him a slave too” you say…

Or maybe, just maybe, the problem to him being there is the will of others to have more. The things as they are, indeed.

As the British Pragmatist philosopher Lloyd Duddridge [MA] said, “Unemployed people pay taxes, too AND they keep local business thriving…”

I will leave you all with a quote from another great philosopher, Alan Watts:

“The hand said we do all our work, the feet said we do our work, the mouth said we do all the chewing, and here’s this lazy stomach that gets it all and doesn’t do a thing. He doesn’t do any work… so lets go on strike. And the hands refuse to carry, the feet refuse to walk, the mouth refuses to chew, and said, “now, we’re on strike against the stomach.” But after a while all of them found themselves getting weaker and weaker, and weaker and weaker because they didn’t recognise that the stomach fed them.”